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The Los Angeles River Recreation Zone Opens its Ninth Season on Memorial Day, May 30, 2022

The public is welcome to kayak, walk, and fish on two sections of the river managed by the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority in Elysian Valley and at the Sepulveda Basin in Encino.

LOS ANGELES (May 26, 2022) — The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) announced today that the Los Angeles River Recreation Zones in Elysian Valley and the Sepulveda Basin will open for their ninth season on Memorial Day, May 30, 2022.

The L.A. River Recreation Zones provide access to recreate on and explore the Los Angeles River in two different parts of the river that are still in a natural state with activities including steerable boating such as kayaking and canoeing, fishing and bird watching. The River Recreation Zones are managed by the MRCA in coordination with the City of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation and Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the County of Los Angeles.

Hours are sunrise to sunset every day, except during and after inclement weather or other adverse conditions. The Recreation Zones will be open through September 30, 2022.

“We are looking forward to another great season,” said MRCA Chief Ranger, Fernando Gomez. “We urge everyone to check out the website www.lariverrecreation.org to find out about river conditions, water quality, weather, and closure information. You can also learn about how to access the river, and outfitters who provide guided tours or rent kayaks.”

The Sepulveda Basin Recreation Zone is a gentle, two-mile up-river and back trip with braided channels, wildlife, and tranquil pools. Of the two Recreation Zones, the Sepulveda Basin offers easy paddling, and less natural obstacles. Kayakers in the Sepulveda Basin will be able to access the Los Angeles River from Burbank Boulevard west of Woodley Avenue. There is plenty of street parking on Woodley Avenue.

The Elysian Valley kayak experience is a five-mile, one-way trip with braided channels and abundant wildlife in the middle of the city. The kayak experience sometimes includes strong currents and a few rapids – you may fall out of your kayak while traveling through them. Boulders and other obstacles are also part of the experience. Be aware that you will likely be getting off your kayak and pulling it through the water to get around rocks in areas. New this year will be the opportunity to kayak under the recently opened, 400-foot Taylor Yard Bridge that connects cyclists and pedestrians from Cypress Park to Elysian Valley across the LA River.

To access the Elysian Valley Recreation Zone, Kayakers can enter the Los Angeles River from MRCA Rattlesnake Park at Fletcher Drive. Parking is available on Fletcher Drive. Access is also available upstream from MRCA Lewis MacAdams Riverfront Park (formerly Marsh Park) whose parking lot entrances are at 2999 Rosanna St. and 2944 Gleneden Street. Public Restrooms are available.

“Everyone needs to remember to take safety precautions when going out on the river,” said Chief Gomez. “You must wear a Personal Flotation Device (PFD) and wear a helmet. Use sunscreen and drink plenty of water.”

The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority is a local public park agency dedicated to the preservation and management of open space, urban parkland, watershed lands, trails, and wildlife habitat. The MRCA manages more than 75,000 acres of public parkland and provides natural resources and scientific expertise, critical regional planning services, operations, fire prevention and ranger services, as well as education and leadership programs for thousands of youth each year. It is one of the lead agencies revitalizing the Los Angeles River.

Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy and Mountains Recreation Authority Acquire Public Land Over 30 Years to Protect the Liberty Canyon Wildlife Corridor

AGOURA, CA (April 21, 2022) — Tomorrow the Wallis Annenberg Wildlife Crossing will break ground at a celebration at the MRCA’s Las Virgenes Open Space Trailhead. The MRCA originally purchased the public parkland in 1999 as part of a long-term acquisition strategy by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy and the MRCA to protect the critical habitat of the Santa Susana Mountains, the Simi Hills, and the Santa Monica Mountains.

In 1990, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy commissioned the study “Critical Wildlife Corridor Habitat Linkage Areas between the Santa Susana Mountains, the Simi Hills and the Santa Monica Mountains.” Furthering Dr. Michael Soule’s earlier work for the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area on habitat linkages, the study identified the site of the Liberty Canyon Wildlife Crossing as the choke point necessary to connect the Santa Monica Mountains across the 101 Freeway to the Simi Hills in order to prevent the local mountain lion population from extinction.

At that time, most of the property in this landscape choke point was privately owned, and the future of preserving this critical inter-mountain range habitat linkage was anything but certain. Over the next thirty years, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, and its joint powers partner, the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority as well as the National Park Service, systematically acquired much of the private land identified in the 1990 study using voter-approved funds, and permanently protected a critical mass of habitat that will now make it possible to link the mountains with the Liberty Canyon Wildlife Crossing.

THE SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS CONSERVANCY is a State Agency that was established by the California Legislature in 1980. Its mission is to strategically buy back, preserve, protect, restore, and enhance treasured pieces of Southern California to form an interlinking system of urban, rural, and river parks, open space, trails and wildlife habitat that is easily accessible to the public.

THE MOUNTAINS RECREATION AND CONSERVATION AUTHORITY (MRCA) is a local public parks agency exercising joint powers of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, the Conejo Recreation and Park District, and the Rancho Simi Recreation and Park District. The MRCA operates and manages all parkland that it owns and that is owned by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy.

Together, the MRCA and Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy have helped to preserve over 80,000 acres of urban and wilderness parkland.

Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority Completes Acquisition of 325-Acre Triangle Ranch at the Gateway to the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area

Escrow Closes on Final 150 Acres of Prime Open Space and Habitat in Phase 4 of Monumental Conservation Achievement

 AGOURA HILLS, CA (December 1, 2021) — The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) announced today that it had closed escrow on—and permanently protected as public parkland—the final 150 acres of the iconic 325-acre Triangle Ranch open space in the central Santa Monica Mountains south of the city of Agoura Hills. The breathtaking landscape, visible to thousands of daily motorists on Kanan Road, has long been identified as a crucial linkage for habitat preservation, watershed protection, and wildlife movement.

This final, Phase 4 acquisition represented an effort of many years and multiple public funding sources and demonstrates the tenacity of the MRCA, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, and area elected officials to preserve the ecologically significant gateway to the Santa Monica Mountains. The MRCA was able to cobble together funds to purchase the property in phases, beginning with the Phase 1 acquisition of 60 acres in 2018. The acquisition of Phases 2 and 3 (40 and 70 acres, respectively,) followed soon after. The purchase of the final 150 acres proved to be the most challenging.

At the request of State Senator Henry Stern and Assemblymember Richard Bloom, Governor Gavin Newsom’s 2021-2022 State Budget set aside $8 million for the Phase 4 acquisition. This contributes to the Governor’s 30 by 2030 initiative to combat the global biodiversity and climate crises and conserve at least 30 percent of California’s land and coastal waters by 2030.

Secretary Wade Crowfoot oversees the California Natural Resources Agency which the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy is part of. “Congratulations to the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy and its partners on closing escrow of the Phase 4 of the Triangle Ranch in greater Los Angeles,” said Crowfoot. “This is the final land acquisition needed to connect a critical wildlife corridor that provides safe passage for mountain lions and other animals. These are the types of actions we need to take to advance California’ ambitious 30×30 goals. “

“All Californians have the right to wild places and open space in their lives,” said Senator Henry Stern. “The culmination of our efforts has proven that wildness still has a chance to survive in the Santa Monica Mountains. Instead of luxury homes being built in a wildfire zone, we’ve preserved this land as public open space and a critical habitat linkage.  We need to scale this kind of integrated biodiversity planning and nature-based Infrastructure across the Rim of the Valley and this sprawling metropolis of Los Angeles.”

Los Angeles County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl was an early and vociferous advocate for public protection of Triangle Ranch, granting $2.5 million in County Proposition A funds for the Phase 1 acquisition. For Phase 4 of the project, Kuehl secured more than $ 1.4 million in Calabasas Landfill Economic Recovery Funds from the Los Angeles County Sanitation District, crucial for the completion of the transaction.

“We often think that only global summits can provide sweeping changes to protect our planet,” said LA County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, “but the truth is, a good deal of our climate action starts right here at home. With this final act in an important preservation effort, state and local governments are permanently protecting hundreds of acres for the benefit of people, plants, wildlife and the planet.”

The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy contributed roughly $2 Million for the Phase 4 acquisition.  “This has been a very long and uncertain process during unprecedently difficult times,” said Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy Chair Irma Muñoz. “The very character of the Santa Monica Mountains would have been permanently changed by private development of this land. Now we have protected the wildlife corridors that animals depend on for survival and preserved magnificent beauty and recreational opportunities for all people.”

The Conservancy had previously contributed more than $9.8 million to the first three phases of the acquisition with a combination of grants from Propositions 40, 50, 84, 1 and 68.

Named for the shape of the land holding, Triangle Ranch ties the approximately 1,000-acre Ladyface Mountain core habitat area with the Liberty Canyon inter-mountain range wildlife corridor, and Malibu Creek State Park.  Mountain lion, mule deer, American badger, bobcat, gray fox, ring-tailed cat, long-tailed weasel, California quail, and dozens of reptile varieties are among the animal species supported by the rugged terrain.

The Phase 4 acquisition features a significant population of the federally-listed annual wildflower Lyon’s pentachaeta and the succulent Agoura Hills dudleya.  The property includes broad swaths of coast live oak woodland, chaparral, purple sage scrub, native and annual grassland, and valley oak savannah. Many rock outcroppings contain unique microsites for plants and animals.

The State Wildlife Conservation Board, which contributed $3.4 million to the acquisition of phase 3 of the project in 2018, identified preservation of the Triangle Ranch property as critical to the functionality of the Liberty Canyon Wildlife Corridor. Caltrans expects to break ground on the wildlife crossing over the 101 Freeway in early 2022.

A formal dedication and public access to Triangle Ranch is also planned for early 2022.

The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) is a local government public entity dedicated to the preservation and management of open space and parkland, watershed lands, trails, and wildlife habitat. The MRCA works in cooperation with other government partners to acquire parkland, participate in vital planning processes, provide natural resources and scientific expertise, and complete major park improvement projects. The MRCA manages and provides ranger services and fire protection for almost 75,000 acres of parkland that it owns and that are owned by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy or other agencies and provides comprehensive education and interpretation and leadership programs for youth. It is one of the lead agencies providing for the revitalization of the Los Angeles River.

 

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Contact:

Dash Stolarz
Director of Public Affairs
dash.stolarz@mrca.ca.gov
310-985-5147 cell

 

 

 

 

 

Questions and Answers about MRCA Parkland and COVID-19 Restrictions

LOS ANGELES (August 20, 2021) – While the COVID-19 pandemic has rebounded in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties largely due to the Delta variant, most public parkland managed by the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA), including that owned by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, is open to the public in accordance with the protocols set forth by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, the Ventura County Department of Public Health and directives by the cities in which the parks are located.

Below are questions and answers about the current status of MRCA parks and trails.

Are all MRCA parks and trails open?
Most MRCA-managed parks and trails are open daily from sunrise to sunset. A list of the MRCA’s most popular parks can be found at this link on its website https://mrca.ca.gov/parks/parklisting/.

Are parking lots and restrooms open?
Parking lots, and many–but not all–restrooms are open at MRCA parks and trails.

Which MRCA parks and facilities are CLOSED

  • All park buildings (with the exception of some outdoor-facing restroom facilities) and offices including those at King Gillette Ranch, Franklin Canyon Park, and Temescal Gateway Park
  • Jerome C. Daniel Overlook above the Hollywood Bowl
  • Los Angeles River Center and Gardens

What about Beach Accessways and Coastal Overlooks managed by MRCA?
Coastal beach accessways and overlooks managed by the MRCA are open. For the latest information, visit the MRCA Coastal Access Program webpage.

Do I need to wear a mask at MRCA parks?
In accordance with the protocols set forth by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health  and Ventura County Department of Public Health, masks are required  to be worn by all persons indoors, which would include restrooms. There is no requirement for masks outdoors.

Can I bring my dog on my hike?
The same park rules apply as always. Dogs are allowed on leash and under owner’s immediate control at most (but not all) parks managed by the MRCA. Check for information on the individual park before you visit.

What else should I know?
Trail amenities, like trash cans, might not be available on your hike. Plan to carry out your own trash—Pack it in and Pack it out!

Be sure to follow basic hiking safety rules: only wear sturdy shoes, carry water, use sunscreen, and wear a hat. Be aware of natural hazards of Southern California open space areas: rattlesnakes, poison oak, and ticks.

Is the Los Angeles River Recreation Zone managed by the MRCA open?
Yes. The two LA River recreation zones managed by the MRCA—in Elysian Valley and in the Sepulveda Basin in Encino—are open for the season until September 30, 2021. For more information, visit the Los Angeles River Recreation Zone website.

Can I book a special event at an MRCA park?
Yes.  Please consult the MRCA Weddings and Special Events webpage for more information.

Is filming allowed at MRCA-managed parks?
Yes.  Please consult the MRCA Filming and Photography webpage for more information.

The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) is a local government public entity dedicated to the preservation and management of open space and parkland, watershed lands, trails, and wildlife habitat. The MRCA works in cooperation with other government partners to acquire parkland, participate in vital planning processes, provide natural resources and scientific expertise, and complete major park improvement projects. The MRCA manages and provides ranger services and fire protection for more than 75,000 acres of parkland that it owns and that are owned by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy or other agencies and provides comprehensive education and interpretation and leadership programs for youth. It is one of the lead agencies providing for the revitalization of the Los Angeles River.

MRCA Acquires Key 320 Acres of Parkland Adjacent to Chino Hills State Park

Brea, CA (August 18, 2021) The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) announced today that it had acquired 320 acres of prime ridgeline parkland adjacent to Chino Hills State Park. This follows an 80-acre acquisition in the same area that closed escrow in late June.  The acquisition was funded by the State Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB), which is an independent Board within the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to carry out an acquisition and development program for wildlife conservation.

In addition to conserving irreplaceable habitat, this major acquisition protects the watershed and the viewshed, and builds on east-west connection between the State Park and Prado Wetlands. These movement corridors are especially important during wildfires when animals need to move between protected areas quickly, as occurred in the 2020 Blue Ridge Fire when both areas burned. Further, protecting 320 acres of prime habitat furthers Governor Newsom’s goal to conserve at least 3o percent of California’s land and coastal waters by 2030 to support the global effort to combat the biodiversity and climate crises, the 30 by 2030 Initiative.

Working with the nonprofit Hills for Everyone, in an effort that took 40+ years to accomplish, the MRCA intends to transfer the land to increase the holdings of Chino Hills State Park.

The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority is a local public park agency dedicated to the preservation and management of open space, urban parkland, watershed lands, trails, and wildlife habitat. The MRCA manages more than 75,000 acres of public parkland and provides natural resources and scientific expertise, critical regional planning services, operations, fire prevention and ranger services, as well as education and leadership programs for thousands of youth each year. For more than 20 years it has been one of the lead agencies revitalizing the Los Angeles River and its tributaries.

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Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority Announces New Environmental Equity Officer

Sarah Rascon will lead the agency’s engagement efforts with communities, elected officials, and public agencies to expand access to the region’s natural resources, while ensuring that the MRCA’s programs and services promote and achieve equitable outcomes.

LOS ANGELES (June 10,2021) –The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) announced today the appointment of Sarah Rascon to the inaugural position of Environmental Equity Officer. Rascon, who joined the MRCA in May 2017, was previously responsible for overseeing urban river programs and initiatives. During her tenure, Rascon led the MRCA’s continuing efforts to revitalize the Los Angeles River with new natural parks and recreational opportunities.

Rascon will be tasked with cultivating, building and strengthening coalitions and networks to advance access to natural resources, parks and conservation among diverse urban constituencies, with an emphasis on marginalized communities. Rascon, most recently oversaw the development of the Upper LA River and Tributaries Revitalization (ULART) Plan, which identifies more than 300 opportunities for environmental and community enhancements, incorporates more than 1,500 public and stakeholder comments, and establishes climate resiliency metrics. The ULART plan spans six cities throughout Los Angeles County in the Upper LA River watershed.

“Sarah’s significant accomplishments in community building, economic vitality, and legislation make her standout to bring neighborhoods and their elected officials together to forge a bold future for equitable public access to the region’s rich natural resources,” said Santa Monica Mountain Conservancy Chairperson, Irma Muñoz, who is the Conservancy’s delegate to the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority.

A native of Los Angeles and fluent in Spanish, Rascon served as field deputy for Assemblymember Jimmy Gomez in the 51st Assembly District where she oversaw Latino/a and LGBTQ affairs, in addition to environmental issues. Rascon was also responsible for more than half of the 51st district, which is her hometown district and encompasses El Sereno, Lincoln Heights, Mt. Washington, Cypress Park, Glassell Park, Eagle Rock, Highland Park, Silverlake, Echo Park, Chinatown, and unincorporated areas of LA County.

Rascon remains committed to public service outside of work and is engaged in the Greater Los Angeles area while serving as an active Board Member of CicLAvia, a delegate to the CA Democratic Party, and also as an appointed Commissioner for the City of Los Angeles, East Area Planning Commission. She is a graduate of the University of California, Merced.

Rascon’s appointment comes as the MRCA continues to enhance and expand its mission to acquire, protect, and preserve open space, wildlife habitat, and urban, mountain and river parkland that is easily accessible and welcoming to all people.

Ms. Rascon will continue to work out of the MRCA’s Los Angeles River Center and Garden’s headquarters in Cypress Park, which is known as the focal point for community driven environmental organizations. Sarah can be reached at sarah.rascon@mrca.ca.gov.

The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority is a local public park agency dedicated to the preservation and management of open space, urban parkland, watershed lands, trails, and wildlife habitat. The MRCA manages more than 75,000 acres of public parkland and provides natural resources and scientific expertise, critical regional planning services, operations, fire prevention and ranger services, as well as education and leadership programs for thousands of youth each year. It is one of the lead agencies revitalizing the Los Angeles River.

MRCA Opens Los Angeles River Recreation Zone with Kayaking on May 31, 2021

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DAN HALDEN/O’FARRELL – (213) 254-7214

HEATHER JOHNSON/LASAN – (213) 798-8714

DASH STOLARZ/MRCA – (323) 221-9944 ×198

 

LOS ANGELES RIVER RECREATION ZONES TO OPEN FOR 2021 KAYAKING AND FISHING SEASON 

New Safety Protocols in Place 

 

LOS ANGELES, CA (May 24, 2021) – Los Angeles City Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell announced that, beginning Memorial Day, the Los Angeles River will once again be open for kayaking, fishing, and increased public access. After last year’s recreation season was halted due to the COVID-19 pandemic, new safety protocols will be in place to ensure the health of all participants.

 

From Memorial Day, May 31, through September 30, 2021, two designated recreation zones, Elysian Valley and the Sepulveda Basin, will be open on a daily basis from sunrise to sunset. The zones provide safe, equitable public access and recreational opportunities that help make the River one of the most unique open spaces in Los Angeles. In years past, thousands of Angelenos have used the zones to kayak, fish, bird watch, and take a stroll on a River-adjacent path. Free access to the recreation zones is provided by the City of Los Angeles.

 

“At long last, more people can learn about and enjoy our beloved Los Angeles River once more,” said Councilmember O’Farrell, who represents Elysian Valley and chairs the Energy, Climate Change, Environmental Justice, & River Committee on the City Council. “I know many of my constituents have been looking forward to this opportunity. Count me among you! I encourage all Angelenos to take part in this one-of-a-kind recreational experience.”

 

“The Sepulveda Basin and Los Angeles River offer a much needed opportunity for Angelenos and our Valley families to relax and have fun outdoors,” said Council President Nury Martinez, who represents the Sepulveda Basin. “I look forward to welcoming people back to this incredible natural amenity.”

 

Both recreation zones are managed and patrolled by rangers from the Mountains Recreation & Conservation Authority (MRCA). To ensure a safe experience, visitors are advised to follow the health and safety protocols posted on signs and in informational material at all public access points. Maps of the access points, and more information, can be found at http://lariverrecreation.org.

 

Visitors are also advised to check water conditions before taking part in one of the recreation zones. This year, solar-powered water quality beacons installed by LA Sanitation & Environment (LASAN) will visually indicate the water quality conditions at the kayaking input sites. The beacons function as follows: green for “safe;” yellow for “safe, but take precautions;” and solid red for “do not kayak.” A blinking red light indicates that the recreation zone is closed for a reason other than water quality. Information about the River’s water quality, which is tested regularly by LASAN, is available at https://lacitysan.org/waterquality. Swimming is prohibited at all times.

 

“The Los Angeles River is a key waterway in the City of Los Angeles, crucial to a healthy environment, biodiversity and our own sense of place and pride,” said Traci Minamide, LA Sanitation and Environment Chief Operating Officer. “LASAN strives to help ensure that all Angelenos are able to safely access and enjoy the River during these recreational months.”

 

Under the oversight of the Mountains Recreation & Conservation Authority (MRCA), a limited number of private kayak vendors will also offer visitors guided tours and kayak rentals for River recreation. As the Los Angeles River continues to evolve into a popular destination and gathering spot, all visitors are encouraged to do their part to keep it clean, so it can continue to  be enjoyed as a cherished natural resource and recreational asset of the City of Los Angeles.

 

A Public Service Announcement, produced by Councilmember O’Farrell’s office in partnership with MRCA, is available on the MRCA’s YouTube page at bit.ly/lariverpsa.

 

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Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, Trust for Public Land Preserve Nearly 1,200 acres of Prime Open Space and Wildlife Habitat

 Home to the California Condor, the acquisition advances Governor Newsom’s recent “30 by 2030” initiative to protect the State’s biodiversity and become more resilient to the Impact of climate change

 LOS ANGELES, CA (December 22, 2020) — The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA), in partnership with The Trust for Public Land, announced today that it had acquired 1,171 acres of the ecologically diverse and historic Hathaway Ranch, also known as Temescal Ranch at the eastern edge of the Sierra Madre Mountains, adjacent to both the western unit of the Angeles National Forest and the Los Padres National Forest between Castaic and Lake Piru. This increases the MRCA’s total protected section of the ranch to 2,400 acres.

As the largest private undeveloped land in Los Angeles County, and entirely in a County-designated “Significant Ecological Area,” the property lies in a critical east to west linkage between the San Gabriel and Sierra Madre mountains as well as a north to south linkage between the Sierra Madre and Santa Susanna mountains, both highlighted in the South Coast Missing Linkages Project, which is a comprehensive plan for a regional network that would maintain and restore critical habitat linkages between existing reserves. These linkages form the backbone of a conservation strategy for Southern California.

“Governor Newsom’s 30 by 2030 initiative recognizes that we must strategically and cooperatively conserve biodiversity in the State. Nature-based solutions are key to making California more resilient to the real and pressing threat of climate change,” said Joseph T. Edmiston, Executive Officer of the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority.  “The completion of this major acquisition precisely demonstrates the MRCA’s ability as a public agency to work together with the many parties involved, including a non profit land trust, State government, and California family landowners to protect critical land for the public benefit.”

The $1.6 million acquisition was spearheaded by the nonprofit Trust for Public Land, which has been working to permanently protect the extraordinary 6,000-acre open space for more than thirty years. The Trust for Public Land worked with the California Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) to secure funding from the State Habitat Conservation Fund and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the Endangered Species Act, Recovery Land Acquisition Program.

“We are thrilled to have partnered with MRCA to make this project a reality. They are an exceptional partner and demonstrate a commitment to protecting the region’s most special places,” said Guillermo Rodriguez, California State Director for The Trust for Public Land. “This property will provide unparalleled outdoor recreation opportunities for the community and will protect some of Southern California’s most unique ecosystems. We look forward to continuing to work with MRCA on a proposed trail network that will give visitors and residents alike the opportunity to explore the region.”

Boasting one of the most extensive stands of coastal sage scrub and chaparral in Southern California, the new parkland supports a wide variety of special status species, including the California condor. Condor foraging on the property is well-documented, as it is close to the Sespe Condor Sanctuary. The land is also vital for maintaining mountain lion movement and genetic diversity throughout Southern California

The property contains the headwaters of two creeks, including one perennial spring, that ultimately feed federally endangered Southern California steelhead habitat downstream in Piru Creek and the Santa Clara River.

This is the second of a multiphase strategy for acquisition of the 6,000-acre ranch. The MRCA had previously acquired 1,230 acres in the first phase from TPL in 2018. The partners are currently in pursuit of the third phase of the project.

In October of this year, Governor Gavin Newsom signed an executive order (N-82-20) ordering the protection of 30 percent of California’s land and coastal waters by 2030 to fight climate change—as evidenced by recent devastating wildfires. The Governor directed state agencies to pursue actions including land conservation that will use land to absorb climate-warming carbon from the atmosphere.

The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) is a local government public entity dedicated to the preservation and management of open space and parkland, watershed lands, trails, and wildlife habitat. The MRCA works in cooperation with other government partners to acquire parkland, participate in vital planning processes, provide natural resources and scientific expertise, and complete major park improvement projects. The MRCA manages and p rovides ranger services and fire protection for almost 75,000 acres of parkland that it owns and that are owned by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy or other agencies and provides comprehensive education and interpretation and leadership programs for youth. It is one of the lead agencies providing for the revitalization of the Los Angeles River.

About The Trust for Public Land

The Trust for Public Land creates parks and protects land for people, ensuring healthy, livable communities for generations to come. Millions of people live within a 10-minute walk of a Trust for Public Land park, garden or natural area, and millions more visit these sites every year. To support The Trust for Public Land and share why nature matters to you, visit www.tpl.org.

New 92-acre Carbon Canyon Open Space Dedicated in Malibu

Philanthropist Alex von Furstenberg donated $350,000 in gap funding
to purchase the spectacular parkland which will connect the Coastal Slope Trail

MALIBU, CALIFORNIA (November 4, 2020)—The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) announced today that it has acquired and dedicated to the public 92 acres of prime Malibu open space in Carbon Canyon.  Offering panoramic views of Saddle Peak and the Pacific Ocean, the acquisition creates 130 acres of contiguous MRCA public open space. The property will eventually be part of the regional Coastal Slope Trail, providing the connection from Sweetwater Mesa to Carbon Canyon.

Philanthropist Alex von Furstenberg, who has previously donated sizable open space dedications to the MRCA in Malibu, provided $350,000 in critical 11th hour funding to secure the acquisition, which was brokered by the nonprofit Trust for Public Land.

The acquisition was made possible by a consortium of public funding sources. Los Angeles County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl provided $730,000 in 3rd District landfill mitigation funds for the purchase, California Natural Resources Agency contributed $500,000 in EEMP funds, and the California Coastal Conservancy contributed $350,000 in Proposition 12 funds.

One hundred percent of the newly protected open space is designated as an “Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Area (ESHA)” and contains almost 2,000 feet of USGS blue line stream.

“I am grateful that the Conservancy continues to create public hikes for all to enjoy the outdoors,” said Alex von Furstenberg.

“The public sector did not have quite enough funding to protect this ecologically significant land,” said Joseph T. Edmiston, Executive Officer of the MRCA.  “Mr. von Furstenberg’s generosity at a critical time assured preservation of a segment of the regionally significant Coastal Slope Trail, which will ultimately provide hikers a path from Topanga State Park to Leo Carrillo State Park where they can enjoy blue water views.”

The property contains a wide variety of vegetation communities including oak woodland, grassland, coastal sage scrub, and chaparral. Beautiful rock outcrops add to the diversity of the rugged terrain.  The MRCA will seek additional grants to develop trail access and viewing areas to make the new parkland accessible to the public.

The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) is a local government public entity dedicated to the preservation and management of open space and parkland, watershed lands, trails, and wildlife habitat. The MRCA works in cooperation with other government partners to acquire parkland, participate in vital planning processes, provide natural resources and scientific expertise, and complete major park improvement projects. The MRCA manages and provides ranger services and fire protection for almost 75,000 acres of parkland that it owns and that are owned by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy or other agencies and provides comprehensive education and interpretation and leadership programs for youth. It is one of the lead agencies providing for the revitalization of the Los Angeles River.

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MRCA Closes Some Parks and Backcountry Trails Because of Extreme Weather Through September 8, 2020

LOS ANGELES (September 5, 2020) – The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority announced today that effective immediately, it will temporarily close many of its parks because of the extreme hot weather and the imminent danger to park users in these conditions. The following Parks will be CLOSED until Tuesday, September 8, 2020:

CLOSED:
Happy Camp Canyon Regional Park
Rocky Peak Park
Ed Davis Park at Towsley Canyon
Mentryville
East and Rice Canyons
Sage Ranch Park
Wilson Canyon Park
Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve
Corral Canyon Park
Cameron Nature Preserve at Puerco Canyon

In addition, all backcountry trails into Topanga State Parks will be closed at Marvin Braude Mulholland Gateway Park (at both the Reseda Blvd. AND Van Alden Avenue entrances) and Temescal Gateway Park.

California State Parks, Conejo Open Space Conservation Agency, and Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area have also closed their Ventura County Parks and Trails.

The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) is a local government public entity dedicated to the preservation and management of open space and parkland, watershed lands, trails, and wildlife habitat. The MRCA works in cooperation with other government partners to acquire parkland, participate in vital planning processes, provide natural resources and scientific expertise, and complete major park improvement projects. The MRCA manages and provides ranger services and fire protection for almost 75,000 acres of parkland that it owns and that are owned by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy or other agencies and provides comprehensive education and interpretation and leadership programs for youth. It is one of the lead agencies providing for the revitalization of the Los Angeles River.

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